PHAC: Closing the Health Equity Gap for Mothers and their Babies: Evidence from an analysis of the Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program

L’événement commencera le 23 janvier 13h00 et se terminera le 23 janvier 14h30 heure de l'est
The event will start on: Jan 23, 01:00pm EST
And will end on: Jan 23, 02:30pm EST

Click here to access the PowerPoint Presentation.
Participants are encouraged to download this related resource: Understanding the Impact of the Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program  Findings from a Quantitative Evaluation
from: Saskatchewan Population Health and Evaluation Research Unit
This is a Fact Sheet summarizing the CPNP Impact Analysis.

Please note - we hope to have the recording edited and posted by Feb. 8, 2013.

This Fireside Chat is in collaboration with Division of Children, Seniors and Healthy Development, Public Health Agency of Canada

The prenatal period is a critical time for child development and sets the foundation for lifelong health and well being.  The prenatal period offers a unique public health opportunity, as pregnant women are more apt to access programs and services and are especially motivated to make changes in their lifestyles.

For more than fifteen years, the Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program (CPNP) has helped communities to promote public health and provide support to improve the health and well being of pregnant women, new mothers and babies facing challenging life circumstances.  These challenges include poverty, teen pregnancy, social and geographic isolation, substance use and family violence. CPNP also increases the availability of culturally sensitive prenatal support for Aboriginal women and recent immigrants.  CPNP fills a distinct gap in communities and complements other "mainstream" prenatal services by offering programming designed specifically to meet the needs of the CPNP target population.

This fireside chat will present results from a CPNP impact analysis which assessed whether high exposure to the program improved the personal health practices of participants, such as smoking and breastfeeding, and birth outcomes of their infants, such as low birth weight and preterm birth. Public health and policy implications of this research will be discussed.  

Presenters:
Dr. Nazeem Muhajarine

Professor and Department Head
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology,
College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan and Saskatchewan Population Health and Evaluation Research Unit (SPHERU)
Bio:
Dr. Muhajarine is a social epidemiologist and leads SPHERU's Healthy Children research program. His work includes researching questions related to community and family contextual influences in child development and health, risk in the prenatal period, and developing community-university research partnerships to improve knowledge creation, transfer and application. His current research includes evaluations of population-level early childhood intervention programs and the Smart Cities, Healthy Kids projects assessing the built and food environments and their impact on children’s health. He particularly cherishes the mentoring role and works closely with junior colleagues and graduate students. He is the recipient of several awards of distinction, including his province's 2009 Health Research Achievement Award and the CIHR Knowledge Translation Award. He is a professor and chair in Community Health and Epidemiology, University of Saskatchewan.

Marla Israel is currently the Acting Director General for the Centre for Health Promotion at the Public Health Agency of Canada.  As such, Ms. Israel is responsible for overseeing policies and programs related to children and seniors’ health, mental health promotion and mental illness prevention, as well as injury prevention and healthy communities files.

Prior to assuming this role, Ms. Israel was Senior Director, Chronic Disease Strategies Division at the Public Health Agency of Canada and from 2007-2010, Corporate Secretary for the Agency and Chief of Staff to Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer, Dr. David Butler-Jones.  From 2001-2007, Ms. Israel was Canada’s Chief Negotiator for international reciprocal social security treaties at the Department of Human Resources and Skills Development.

Public Health Agency of Canada – Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program
http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/hp-ps/dca-dea/prog-ini/cpnp-pcnp/index-eng.php

Canadian Best Practices Portal – Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program
http://66.240.150.14/intervention/821/view-eng.html

Canadian Journal of Public Health – Understanding the Impact of the Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program: A Quantitative Evaluation (Abstract)
http://journal.cpha.ca/index.php/cjph/article/view/2959

Saskatchewan Population Health and Evaluation Research Unit - Understanding the Impact of the Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program: A Quantitative Evaluation (full report)
http://www.spheru.ca/research_projects/projects/Project.pdf/Muhajarine%20CPNP%20Impact%20Analysis%20final%20report%20Sept%202009.pdf

 

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