#450 Partners in advocacy: public health roles and potential partners in advocacy for health equity

The event will start on: Jun 16, 01:00pm EDT
And will end on: Jun 16, 02:30pm EDT

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button powerpoint pres   audio recording

“Social advocacy is central to the mission of public health and a significant responsibility for public health professionals.” – Dorfman, Sorenson & Wallack (2009), pg. 15

This webinar will further explore the 4 public health roles in advocacy for health equity as described in the new Let’s Talk: Advocacy and health equity (http://nccdh.ca/resources/entry/lets-talk-advocacy-and-health-equity). Guest presenters will share two examples, one focused on the experience of advocating for a healthy public transit policy, and one exploring where potential opportunities exist for engaging the business sector as advocacy partners.

With our special guests we will explore:
1. What are the four advocacy roles for public health? How do they apply to each type of social advocacy?
2. What have we learned from our public health advocacy efforts in the area of healthy public transit policy?
3. How can public health engage non-traditional partners, including the business sector, in advocacy?

Advisors on tap:

Dr. Patricia Daly, MD, FRCPCDr Daly
Dr. Daly is the Chief Medical Health Officer and the Vice President, Public Health for Vancouver Coastal Health. She is also a Clinical Professor in the School of Population and Public Health in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of British Columbia.

As CMHO, her primary mandate is to improve the health of the population served by VCH through population health approaches and public health initiatives. Working with our partners to create healthy communities is one of the most powerful approaches available to prevent disease and disability and maximize good mental and physical health. Patty was closely involved in advocating for healthy public transit policy in relation to the recent transit referendum in the lower mainland of BC (http://vchblogs.ca/transportation-referendum-health-benefits/).

Dr Mark LysyshynDr. Mark Lysyshyn, MD, MPH, FRCPC
Dr. Lysyshyn is a Medical Health Officer with Vancouver Coastal Health responsible for the North Shor of Vancouver. He obtained his medical degree from Queen’s University and a Masters of Public Health from the Harvard School of Public Health. He completed residency training in Public Health and Preventive Medicine and Internal Medicine at the University of British Columbia.


Coro StandbergCoro Strandberg, Principal of Strandberg Consulting (www.corostrandberg.com)
Ms. Strandberg helps companies become leaders in corporate social responsibility strategies and business models. A professionally trained social worker with experience as a Social Planner for the City of Surrey and Social Policy Director for the BC Government, for the past 20 years of her career she has been helping businesses embed social sustainability into corporate purpose and business strategies. Coro gained this experience in the 1980s and 1990s as a Director and then Chair of the Board of Vancity Credit Union, which she helped become a global leader in values-based banking. She will share her insights on how business can be mobilized as a force for good, going beyond harm reduction to creating social value strategies. She will explore how business can become a partner in healthy equity.


Facilitators:

Lesley Dyck

Lesley Dyck, MA
Knowledge Translation Specialist,
National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH)

 

Sume N

Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh, MHSc
Knowledge Translation Specialist,
National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health
(NCCDH)

 

Who should attend?
Public health practitioners at all levels, and others working for social change, will find new ideas to get from where they are to where they want to be in advocating for healthy public policy in Canada.

Online conversation:
We will also be hosting an online conversation at Health Equity Clicks http://nccdh.ca/community during the week of the webinar (June 15-18). Anyone can join and participate in a discussion of what social advocacy means for them in their public health work.

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